Jobs in Biodiversity & Environmental Restoration

A suggestion that came up in our Climate Change Brain Trust meetings was the need to create jobs in biodiversity and environmental restoration.

@Adriana_Humanes, @clipchin, @Evilla, @Georgina_Beresford, and @joborevitz, as you’ve all worked in the field of conservation and restoration, I’d like to ask your take on this. What sort of jobs could those be?

Hi @marz62 and @cdurigan - It would be nice if you could share some light on the type of jobs necessary for effective biodiversity and environmental restoration.

Ok, just a quick listing here (off the top of my head):

Biologists (botanists/plant biologists, plant physiologists/bio-chemists, entomologists, zoologists)
Ecologist
Soil Ecologist (note: soil biodiversity – frequently overlooked in conservation efforts – is vital to land biodiversity conservation [see: C.A. Guerra et al]; soils harbor roughly 1/4 of all species on Earth)
Naturalist (birders, too!)
Horticulturalist (specializing in outdoor horticulture)
(possibly) Environmental Engineer (may coordinate with Admin. for enviro-compliance monitoring)
(various) Field workers (including those with landscaping experience)
Citizen Scientists (may serve as substitutes for some ecologist/naturalist work, like ecosystem inventorying, and documenting [see below])
Photographer/ and/or/ Videographer (for documenting of restoration efforts and academic and public education; may be performed also by citizen scientists)
Project Manager (project coordination)
Resource Management Specialist (may have local/state/federal resource mngt. experience)
Administrative (? budgeting/allocations, grant writing, gov/public communications)

3 Likes

Thanks @marz62 for sharing these insights.

In relation to this discussion we have another discussion on key barriers to achieving environmental equity. Would love to have your thoughts on this discussion as well.

This might also link to the idea to promote science (and climate science) via the use of citizen science.

1 Like

Foresters are important for the health of our world’s forests.

1 Like