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Can we make use of bio-hackers to accelerate drug R&D and approval process?

RoeyRoey Posts: 66 mod
Here's a tough one. We all know about bio-hackers: they conduct their own research on drugs, and even manufacture existing drugs in their homes - or teach others how to do it easily with widely-available tools. Bio-hackers may be able to complement the established pharma industry in experimentation and R&D of drug candidates for age-reversal, as well as by anecdotally demonstrating their effectiveness - sometimes on their own bodies.

What do you think about that?

[Here's a description of bio-hacking in general]

Short Description
The Do It Yourself (DIY) movement advocates for building and modifying items without the direct involvement of experts in the process. While the DIY movement today deals primarily with arts, crafts, and electronics, some ‘makers’ (people who pride themselves on leading the DIY revolution) also dabble in biotechnology as ‘bio-hackers’.
The tools for DIY medicine today include genetic engineering kits that can be operated in people’s kitchens, 3D printers, chemical printers, small $5 PCR devices, pressure cookers as autoclaves, and other items that can be cheaply acquired online(“$5 DNA Replicator,” n.d.; “Biohackers 3D Print DIY Chemical Reactor For Medicine,” 2018; “Creating a low-cost 3D printing medical lab | Ultimaker,” n.d.; “DIY Autoclave from a Pressure Cooker - Dave’s Homestead,” 2016; Sneed, n.d.; Zhang, 2018).

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