Maintenance of centralized water treatment is cumbersome and costly

Thanks @ssinharay6 and sorry for delay. Sometimes is for me impossible to be online. Paracas will be desalination plant not only with solar and gas energy (mix of both) but also 0 residual water since natural areas could not receive tue contammination of this.
The principale applied will be GREENLY´s but with some adjustments. Residual sludge (mainly salt will be reused and the residual water primary treatment (many industries in the area) will be oxigenation by macrophites to allow our system to apply to residual water REUSE FOR THE INDUSTRY. That is the idea in general. Please see the vieo form Paracas projecto in our website. I have the material in English but my website was in Spanish form the beginning since L.A was our main point of operations. Now we are apreading so soon my website will be adjusted. If any other doubt do not hesitate to write. Will be gladly answering…

@ssinharay6 Thank you for elaborating on the subject and sharing lifespan examples. I’m curious, from your experience, would savings on things as labor cost and energy involved in large centralized systems (i.e., pumping to a central area) would be sufficient to interest regulators in incorporating the system, or does the upfront cost remains crucial? If so, can it be potentially mitigated through a cost-recovery plan?

@bhaskarmv Thank you for your comment. Out of curiosity, could such crucial nutrients be pulled out as part of the process in a decentralized system, or would it require involving other actors/specialized industries?

Hello all, considering your familiarity with innovations in this space, what would be the ideal minimum specialized maintenance (by skilled workforce)?

  • Please feel free to include any variables you find to be relevant – i.e., frequency, cost, size of workforce etc.

@Eti Once again thanks for your valuable inputs. Typically, the wastewater infrastructure comprises of following elements:
**• Septic tanks;
• Small treatment plants;
• Collection network;
• Pumping stations; and
• Wastewater treatment plants. **
Apart from this, operating a wastewater treatment also includes: electric fee, water discharge fee, chemical fee, sludge transport and disposal and administrative fee. In my opinion, nothing can be ignored at any stage. Thus, a full fledged blueprint is required before operating any kind of wastewater treatment plant. Though cost recovery planning is totally new for me. Would like to explore more about it. Just in case, if I am not clear with my clarifications, please let me know.

@GREENLY Thanks for your response. Will definitely look forward to check your updated website for more information.

@Eti I would like to point out the basic blueprint of cost factors of a typical wastewater treatment. As i mentioned before, the wastewater infrastructure comprises of following elements:
• Septic tanks;
• Small treatment plants;
• Collection network;
• Pumping stations; and
• Wastewater treatment plants
.
Apart from this, operating a wastewater treatment also includes: electric fee, water discharge fee, chemical fee, labor cost, sludge transport and disposal and administrative fee. Thus, cost recovery planning is equally important before running a wastewater treatment.

@Econvert, @mvanberkel, I’d like to ask your opinion here as well. Specifically to @Eti’s question: what would be the ideal minimum specialized maintenance (by skilled workers) of water treatment?