As much as 30% (1.3 billion tons) or more of all food is lost or goes to waste along the food value chain globally, and in cities, less than 2% of the nutrients in food by-products and other waste produced is recovered and put to good use.

How can our society transform these food systems for the better? What breakthrough solutions are there to produce a healthier and more sustainable supply chain, across multiple different points of opportunity?

Our team is currently designing a brand new prize competition that will seek to drive breakthrough concepts towards a new circular economy of food, where packaging and food value chain byproducts can be reused, and natural and agricultural environments can be sustained to vastly reduce the amount of waste in food systems.

Join the community today to support this effort, or click here to read more about the prize design.

About the Circular Food Economy Prize Design

NickAzerNickAzer Portland, OR, USAPosts: 183 admin
edited July 21 in Circular Food Economy
The Circular Food Economy Prize Design is an ambitious initiative that aims to drive breakthrough concepts towards new methods and materials for food packaging, plastics, reuse, and waste.

This project uses multiple methodologies to assess the current landscape in order to ensure we design a Circular Food Economy prize that can create transformative, but scalable new concepts for a new circular economy of food, where packaging and food value chain byproducts can be reused, and natural and agricultural environments can be sustained to vastly reduce the amount of waste in food systems.

The final product of this process of researching and discussions, the Prize Design, will provide the outline of what the winning team must accomplish to be awarded the prize.

Join this online community of experts to get involved, and share your wisdom with the crowd!

The Challenge

As much as 30% (1.3 billion tons) or more of all food is lost or goes to waste along the food value chain globally, and in cities, less than 2% of the nutrients in food by-products and other waste produced is recovered and put to good use.

How can our society transform these food systems for the better? What breakthrough solutions are there to produce a healthier and more sustainable supply chain, across multiple different points of opportunity?

The Goal

We are designing an XPRIZE that will seek to drive breakthrough concepts towards a new circular economy of food, where packaging and food value chain byproducts can be reused, and natural and agricultural environments can be sustained to vastly reduce the amount of waste in food systems.

The Prize Design will provide the outline of what the winning team must accomplish to be awarded the prize and define the parameters of the XPRIZE competition. It is audacious, yet achievable.

Your Role

The community is currently debating the challenges and opportunities associated with creating innovative food packaging.

We invite you to join us and other experts from around the world to share your wisdom with the crowd and advise us on the design of this XPRIZE Circular Food Economy Prize Design!

What’s in it for you

We know your time is precious, and we appreciate your participation and input.

None of the other benefits below come close to the reward of knowing that you contributed to a truly transformative breakthrough.

We will regularly announce the most prolific community members to recognize their contributions. Participation allows you to:
  • Network with diverse stakeholders;
  • Brainstorm with top experts;
  • Promote your work;
  • Earn rewards, such as online gift cards.

Monthly rewards for the best contributors and excellence in the community will be announced at the end of each month.

XPRIZE team

This Prize Design is led by @Caroline, @BryanNamba, @Eti, and @nmgraham. @NickAzer manages the online community.

Need help?

If you have questions or need help, leave a comment here or contact the community manager, Nick Azer, via [email protected] We look forward to engaging with you here on this exciting project!

Comments

  • LHansonLHanson Associate Professor, Environmental Studies Posts: 1
    Are Canadians eligible for the prizes?
  • nmgrahamnmgraham Posts: 39 XPRIZE
    Hi @LHanson ! Since we are just beginning the prize design, we do not have that information. However, XPRIZE competitions are usually held at the global level, meaning anyone with a good idea can be a competitor!
  • UtobouUtobou JapanPosts: 8 ✭✭
    Hi team! I have a question.
    Where should be the problem, or the target of this prize, of plastic food packaging? Is the problem "using", "discarding", "not being fully recycled", "improperly processed after discarding", or all of above? Plastic itself is used not only in food packaging, but in all kinds of everyday items. So I think that if we want a scalable solution on this issue, we should also focus on "post-use" problems together with plastic alternatives. Of course, I fully understand that it must be great to have a solution of non-plastic alternative food packages, which would wipe out ALL plastic food packages from all countries in the globe.
  • nmgrahamnmgraham Posts: 39 XPRIZE
    @Utobou , at this early stage we are definitely considering *all* phases of the plastic food packaging lifecycle, therefore we welcome any and all comments/resources/references etc! Once we have a more narrow scope we will definitely inform the community via new Key Issue discussions.
  • ThankuThanku Posts: 23 ✭✭
    Hi. I wasn't sure if this was the appropriate place to post this link, but came across this piece and it seemed relevant to this prize: https://www.fastcompany.com/90522466/banana-leaf-packaging-and-pineapple-powder-how-dole-plans-to-eliminate-food-waste-by-2025
  • nmgrahamnmgraham Posts: 39 XPRIZE
    @thanku thanks for the reference!
  • kcamphuiskcamphuis cofounder Posts: 2
    Hi
    Have a look at what 's been done (and written) by https://foodandcity.org/projects/challenge/ and https://www.linkedin.com/in/robyn-metcalfe-1781456/ on this topic : probalby the most inspired thought leaders I've met.
  • nmgrahamnmgraham Posts: 39 XPRIZE
    @kcamphuis , thanks so much for the suggestions! Robyn is definitely someone we would want to talk with.
  • FranckSaintMartinFranckSaintMartin Public Affairs Manager Posts: 2
    @NickAzer , as mentioned in the introduction, in a circular food economy the role of value chain byproducts and the re-processing/refining of organic waste is important to reduce the pressure on agriculture. i see the current discussion is more focused on innovative packaging. will the topic of reuse of byproducts covered in this phase of the prize?
  • nmgrahamnmgraham Posts: 39 XPRIZE
    @FranckSaintMartin , short answer: Yes! We are currently working on designing a values foundation for a circular economy idea and what that will look like when applied to industry(s), but we haven't gotten there yet. Stay tuned for threads regarding this subject, should be posted sometime in the next week.
  • EtiEti Posts: 72 XPRIZE
    @FranckSaintMartin and to build on @nmgraham answer, we are also exploring such aspects within food packaging to answer sustainability in production and end of life, as well as value-add propositions of a broader Circular Food Economy. Other considerations also include the importance of packaging in minimizing such losses. As such, any thoughts you can share about challenges (and opportunities re the above-mentioned context) regarding value chain byproducts / organic waste would be extremely helpful! Thank you in advance.
  • LaurenTurkLaurenTurk Founder & CEO Posts: 2
    Hello - food systems as they exist in nature are inherently circular (regenerative). Any fruit from a tree not eaten decomposes, the nutrients return to the soil and a new phase of life begins. Waste is a human invention. To create a circular solution we ought to lean into the zero-waste nature-based systems that already exist. We're running out of topsoil from decades of industrial farming without replenishing nutrients back into the soil. This is largely because we throw food in landfills, where nutrients are lost forever (and also generate methane), and because we use synthetic fertilizers. Over time, the soil is bereft of nutrients and erodes away. Healthy soil draws down carbon, stores water, has a spongy structure, and is full of nutrients. This is important for mitigating risk in agriculture (healthy soil is more resilient to drought, fire and flood) as well as carbon storage (rebuilding soil is a carbon drawdown solution). To rebuild soil we need to put actual nutrients back into it, and to do that nothing new needs to be invented - we just need to compost. Creating the infrastructure and culture for composting is in effect addressing our soil health crisis, methane emissions, storing carbon, mitigating climate disasters, building food security and resilience and...if done with a hyper local and decentralized approach, there are incredible cobenefits for healthy and resilient community as well. In conclusion I'd like to see soil health and compost as a part of this prize design.
  • LaurenTurkLaurenTurk Founder & CEO Posts: 2
    edited August 3
    Here's an article re: soil https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2019/may/30/topsoil-farming-agriculture-food-toxic-america
    And here's a report by ReFED on reducing food waste. 43% of America's foodwaste comes from households, 40% comes from consumer facing businesses (this would include grocery stores). https://www.refed.com/downloads/ReFED_Report_2016.pdf Food for thought ;)
  • nmgrahamnmgraham Posts: 39 XPRIZE
    @LaurenTurk , thanks for the insight and resources! Would love to hear more from you on our newest post that will be out shortly, I'll make sure you are tagged in it!
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